Plant of the Week: Sun and Blues

Sunny Boulevard Hypericum from Proven Winners ColorChoice
Sunny Boulevard™ Hypericum

Hypericum is having a moment.

Maybe I'm just saying that because I want it to be true, because I do really like this plant. After all, what's not to love? It's adaptable and easy to grow. It flowers all summer long - nice flowers, too, not wimpy little 'nice try' blooms. It's deer resistant, drought tolerant, and bees love it. We hear so much about the need to grow native plants that support pollinator populations. Well, here's one, and it looks great, too.

Sunny Boulevard Hypericum from Proven Winners ColorChoice
Sunny Boulevard™ Hypericum

We have two great varieties here: Blues Festival® and Sunny Boulevard™ Hypericum.

Both are loaded with very showy yellow flowers all summer long. Sunny Boulevard™ may bloom a little longer, into September, but Blues Festival® has really cool blue-green foliage. We like these varieties because they have both very long bloom times and nice, densely branched habits that look as sharp in containers as they do in the landscape. They're both hardy to USDA 4 and grow 2-3' tall.

Blues Festival Hypericum from Proven Winners ColorChoice
Blues Festival® Hypericum

Anyway, I'm not saying that it's having a moment just because I want it to happen. I have seen more and more Hypericum in landscapes recently. I think that for many people the excellent deer-resistance is the real appeal. That's no small thing, and if you're in an area with heavy deer browsing pressure you might put this on your list along with the Caryopteris and Russian sage.

Blues Festival Hypericum from Proven Winners ColorChoice
Blues Festival® Hypericum

I was lucky enough to be at the APLD conference in Boston, and we saw LOTS of Hypericum in the gardens we toured. The northeast has even more deer than it does Dunkin' Donuts, so plants that resist browsing are a must.

So this isn't just me trying to make fetch happen. It's a thing. Just like on Wednesdays we wear pink.

Plant of the Week is written by Jane Beggs-Joles

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